The Goldilocks Rule: How to Stay Motivated in Life and Business

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​It was 1955 and Disneyland had just opened in Anaheim, California when a ten-year-old boy walked in and asked for a job. Labor laws were loose back then and the boy managed to land a position selling guidebooks to visitors for $0.50 a piece.

Within a year, he had transitioned to Disney’s magic shop where he learned tricks from the older employees. He experimented with jokes and tried out simple magic routines on the visitors. Soon, he discovered that what he loved was not performing magic, but performing in general. The young boy set his sights on becoming a comedian.

Once he entered high school, he started performing in small clubs around Los Angeles. The crowds were small and his act was short. He was rarely on stage for more than five minutes. In one case, he literally delivered his standup routine to an empty club.

It wasn’t glamorous work, but there was no doubt he was getting better. His first magic routines would only last one or two minutes. By high school his material had expanded to include a five minute skit and then a ten minute show. At the age of 19, he was performing weekly at clubs for twenty minutes at a time. Of course, he had to read three poems during the act just to make the routine long enough, but still. He was improving.

He spent another decade experimenting, adjusting, and practicing his act. He took a job as a television writer and, gradually, he was able to land his own appearances on television shows. By the mid-1970s, he had worked his way into being a regular guest on The Tonight Show and Saturday Night Live.

After nearly 15 years of work, he broke through to wild success. He toured 60 cities in 63 days. Then 72 cities in 80 days. Then 85 cities in 90 days. 18,695 people attended one show in Ohio. 45,000 tickets were sold for his 3-day show in New York. He catapulted to the top of his genre and became one of the most important comedians of his time.

His name was Steve Martin.

Comedy is not for the faint of heart. It is hard to imagine a situation that would strike fear into the hearts of more people than failing to get a single laugh on stage. And yet, Steve Martin worked at it for 18 years. In his words, “10 years spent learning, 4 years spent refining, and 4 years spent in wild success.” His story offers a fascinating perspective on motivation, perseverance, and consistency.

Why do we stay motivated to reach some goals, but not others? Why do we say we want something, but give up on it after a few days? What is the difference between the areas where we naturally stay motivated and those where we give up?

Scientists have been studying motivation for decades. While there is still much to learn, one of the most consistent findings is that perhaps the best way to stay motivated is to work on tasks of “just manageable difficulty.”

The Goldilocks Rule states that humans experience peak motivation when working on tasks that are right on the edge of their current abilities. Not too hard. Not too easy. Just right.

Martin’s comedy career was a perfect example of what The Goldilocks Rule looks like in the real world. Wanting to improve your life is easy. Sticking with it is a different story. If you want to stay motivated for good, then start with a challenge that is just manageable, measure your progress, and repeat the process.

Your Abilita consultant, with many years of experience in the industry, has that same motivation and dedication. This helps to ensure they get things right and provides you with the confidence you are looking for when hiring a consultant.

admin@abilita.comThe Goldilocks Rule: How to Stay Motivated in Life and Business
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Lessons from Catastrophic Events

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Key Planning Guidelines for Disaster
Recovery and Business Continuity

Disaster recovery should be a critical component for any business that relies on technology. Hurricanes Harvey and Irma highlight an important lesson for businesses. On a more local level, cable cuts and other outages cause disruptions to data and/or voice services. It doesn’t take a natural disaster to create havoc. And today, it’s not a matter of if it happens…it’s when it happens. What would the impact be to your business if you lost voice or data communications?

A data and voice continuity plan is like insurance. You need to ask yourself what is the cost in lost business and productivity in the event of a failure in voice or data communications for an hour, 4 hours or even 4 days.

For many major service providers, the mean time to repair a lost connection is four hours. But as evidenced by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, outages can be significantly longer.

Businesses need to assess the potential costs of any disruption, and how redundant coverage and alternate routes can lessen the consequence cost of lost business.

You can’t predict the effects of a disaster, but you can plan for one. A carefully considered business continuity plan will help make coping with a disaster less impactful, and enable you to minimize disruption to the business and your customers.

For more details, read our full report titled “Lessons From Catastrophic Events

An independent communications technology consultant can help you create a disaster recovery plan that meets your critical business needs. This will help to minimize the impact of service disruptions so you can get back up and running as quickly as possible after a disaster. As we have learned, and some the hard way, it’s better to be safe than sorry!

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The Telecom Consulting Playbook: How The Game is Won

Great sports teams don’t just go out and play the game, they have a strategy. Coaches work with each other and their players to develop skills and put a plan in place to ensure the entire team succeeds. Your telecommunications consulting firm should do the same. If you want to save money on your telecom expenses, you have to play it smart and work as a team. Good telecom consultants will have at least four plays in their telecom playbook:

  • The Audit Maneuver: A thorough telecom audit allows your business to recover overages from your telecom provider for billing errors and unwanted services. Your audit will also provide a complete inventory of your devices, lines, circuits, and features so you can stop paying for things you don’t need.
  • The 2-Part Contract Conversion: when it’s time to renew telecom contracts, it’s tempting to keep what you have. However, as retention pricing is rarely as good as acquisition pricing, it’s important to submit a RFP (request for proposal) when the contract is nearing its end. If you don’t have time, or you simply want an expert who does it all the time, your Abilita consultant can help. We are intimately familiar with pricing schedules, tariffs, service guides, and telecom contract terminology, making us the best resource to help you through this process.
  • Project Management Blitz: Technology upgrades and company growth require efficient project management leadership and tools. We can help with decision-making or simple strategy.
  • TEM Formation: As new services emerge, telecommunications expense management can become a challenging task. Excess charges and unwanted services have a tendency to crop up even after your initial telecom audit. Monthly audits can help you stay on top of your telecom expenses.

Finally (and don’t worry, we’re almost to the end of this sports analogy), football teams have a head coach and an assistant coach for a reason. These two people work together for the good of the team, and while they depend on one another, it is the head coach who ultimately calls the shots. If you’re ready for an assistant telecom coach, or to receive your free telecommunications audit, contact your Abilita consultant.

admin@abilita.comThe Telecom Consulting Playbook: How The Game is Won
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